Lenses

At The Eyeglass Place of Newington, we take the time to make it clear to our patrons that not all lenses are created equally. There are a number of factors that go into properly selecting a lens based on the individual needs. In fact, selecting the correct and appropriate lens for each person is a complex science. Fortunately, our licensed opticians are extensively trained to help you choose a lens that best fits your lifestyle and budget.

comparison between regular and high definition lenses

Whatever your selection is, you can be comforted to know that you will receive the very best optical quality lenses that are available on the market because when it comes to your vision, there is no compromise. At The Eyeglass Place, we make sure that we are up to date on our lens technologies which is why digitally mastered lenses are at the top of our list of options. Bottom line, putting outdated lenses in a swanky new frame just makes no sense.

Types of Lenses

Lens Type: Single Vision

Diagram of a single vision lens

A single vision lens hold one type of power throughout the entire lens, typically used for distance or reading magnification.

Lens Type: Bifocal

diagram of the near and distance focused areas of a bifocal lens

A bifocal lens design is equipped with two ranges of power, typically distance and near. This design can also be used as a computer or specialty lens. Often referred to as a lined bifocal, it is easily identified by the semi-circle segment at the bottom of the lens.

Lens Type: Trifocal

diagram of the distance, intermediate, and near focus areas of a trifocal lens

Similar to a traditional lined bifocal, a trifocal lens is equipped with three defined areas of vision; distance, intermediate (computer range), and near. Like the bifocal, this lens is easily identified by the three lines differentiating the separate ranges of power.

Lens Type: Progressive

diagram of the distance, intermediate, and near focus areas of a progressive lens

Blessed with an infinite number of focal points, the progressive lens design graduates uninterrupted from the distance range down to the near. As a results, the wearer can see far, intermediate, and near with the disruption of any lines of demarcation.

Lens Type: Computer

diagram of a woman sitting at a computer

Computer glasses work very much like a bifocal or progressive except they have the intermediate prescription in place of the distance. This allows the wearer to comfortably view their computer screen for extended periods of time, a reading portion to see any up close work, and in some specialty lenses, a small spot of distance at the very top.

Lens Design

glasses lens superimposed on a leaf

Selecting a lens design can be an overwhelming process. Our licensed opticians will help to simplify the process by recommending only the lenses that will best fit your prescription needs, lifestyle, and budget. Because there are literally hundreds of lens designs that we offer, the simplest breakdown is by conventional and digital.

Conventional:

Traditional lenses are fabricated from a semi-finished lens blank that was molded using glass molds. The lens design, base curve, and add power are molded onto the front surface of the lens and the patient’s prescription is then ground into the back of the lens blank. While this traditional method is able to provide correction for nearsightedness, farsightedness, and/or astigmatisms, flaws in the lens may still exist which can affect your vision.

Digital:

Traditional lenses are fabricated from a semi-finished lens blank that was molded using glass molds. The lens design, base curve, and add power are molded onto the front surface of the lens and the patient’s prescription is then ground into the back of the lens blank. While this traditional method is able to provide correction for nearsightedness, farsightedness, and/or astigmatisms, flaws in the lens may still exist which can affect your vision.

Conclusion? Digital lens surfacing is SIX times more accurate than traditional lens processing because it requires less tooling and has direct contact with the lens, translating greater accuracy, think analog TV versus HDTV.

Lens Material

Selecting the appropriate lens material for your prescription and frame choice is an important step of the process. Our licensed opticians are trained and educated to help make the best recommendation based on your individual needs. It is important to note that all lenses regardless of material are manufactured according to OSHA safety standards.

Digital:

Traditional lenses are fabricated from a semi-finished lens blank that was molded using glass molds. The lens design, base curve, and add power are molded onto the front surface of the lens and the patient’s prescription is then ground into the back of the lens blank. While this traditional method is able to provide correction for nearsightedness, farsightedness, and/or astigmatisms, flaws in the lens may still exist which can affect your vision.

Polycarbonate:

A step above plastic, polycarbonate has a higher impact resistance however can still scratch easily. It is a lighter, thinner option to the plastic lens and is used along with Trivex for ALL children’s glasses.

Trivex:

This material is both impact and scratch resistant. Its durability makes it one of the top choices for standard prescription ranges in all frame designs – full, semi-rimless, and drill mount.

Hi-Index:

This lens design is by far the lightest and thinnest material available. Depending on the prescription and frame choice, hi-index lenses come in a variety of thinness that will be evaluated and determined by our licensed opticians to best suit your needs.

Lens Treatments & Coatings

Our opticians will provide you with information and recommendations for all the lens treatment options available to you so you are able to make an educated decision based on your individual needs.

Scratch-Resistant Coating:

Although this special coating provides some resistance to scratching, it is not scratch proof. If handled improperly, the lenses can still be scratched.

UV Protection:

Ultraviolet radiation can play a significant role in the development of various eye conditions such as cataracts, skin cancer, pterygium, and macular degeneration. For these reasons we are committed to providing all sunwear with a 99- to 100% UV-A/B/C protection.

Anti-Reflective Coating:

Originally created for night time driving, an anti-reflective coating eliminated the glare on the front surface of the lens and allows the light to focus in a solid beam to the back of the eye. By refocusing the light deflection, eye strain is greatly reduced and the vision is improved by an average of 18% compared to lenses without this treatment. Provided that this treatment option is the ONLY option to improve the optical quality of your lenses, our opticians highly recommend this coating to all of our patrons. Over 90% of Eyeglass Place patrons prefer an anti-reflective coating.

image of a scene as viewed through lenses without anti-glare
image of a scene as viewed through lenses with anti-glare

Polarization:

Polarized lenses are the only lenses that offer protection from UV-A, UV-B, and UV-C. This technique blocks dangerously intense glare which is the result of scattered light traveling in a horizontal direction. Because of their unparalleled glare and UV protection, polarized lenses are the number one recommendation for sun protection from our opticians.

image of a scene as viewed through lenses without polarization
image of a scene as viewed through lenses with polarization

Photochromatic:

This lens, commonly referred to as a color changing or transitional lens, gradually adjusts its tint level in response to UV light exposure. Much like sunblock protects your skin, these lenses block out 100% of the sun’s harmful UV rays. However, because Transitions require UV light to activate, they do NOT change in the car. This is because car windshields have built-in UV blockers.


Reach Us

The Eyeglass Place
2311 Berlin Turnpike
Newington, CT 06111
860-667-0921